Fun Stuff

* Learn To Cook Khmer Foods

Traditional Cambodian cuisine is one of detail, of small amounts of fresh ingredients with intriguing textures,

Trei Prama Chien Sach Chrouk Porng Tea

complex aromas and exhilarating flavours, combined to create a distinctly light, delicate and healthy cuisine.

Fist, both fresh and its preserved forms – prahok (fermented) and trei chha-ae(smoked), plentiful from the Great Lake (Tonle Sap) and the Mekong River are predominant components of Cambodian cuisine, as are lemon grass, kaffir lime, galangal, turmeric, garlic and shallot. Cambodian cuisine differs from others in the region in its careful use of chillies, in only a few dishes are they cooked with other ingredients. Rather, chillies are served on the side on the side and left to each person’s taste whether or not to add them to the food.

 

* Learn To Speak Khmer

Even with a small Khmer vocabulary you will be liked by many in Cambodia, they enthusiastically improve your

Khmer Subscripts

pronunciation and teach you a few more words to reward your efforts.
The Khmer language is non-tonal, but the language has a complex pronunciation, with 33 consonants (some seemingly identical, some in difficult to pronounce consonant combinations) and about 24 vowels and diphthongs.
Khmer is written in a beautiful script, which is derived from Sanskrit. We have tried to approach the proper pronunciation of words and sentences without having to use phonetic charts. Pronunciation is based on the English language.

Click Here To Learn Khmer Language by Yourself !

raditional Cambodian cuisine is one of detail, of small amounts of fresh ingredients with intriguing textures, complex aromas and exhilarating flavours, combined to create a distinctly light, delicate and healthy cuisine. 

Fist, both fresh and its preserved forms – prahok (fermented) and trei chha-ae(smoked), plentiful from the Great Lake (Tonle Sap) and the Mekong River are predominant components of Cambodian cuisine, as are lemon grass, kaffir lime, galangal, turmeric, garlic and shallot. Cambodian cuisine differs from others in the region in its careful use of chillies, in only a few dishes are they cooked with other ingredients. Rather, chillies are served on the side on the side and left to each person’s taste whether or not to add them to the food.
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